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Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Who Pooped In Central Park? Scat and Tracks for Kids by Gary D. Robson


Who Pooped in Central Park
Scat and Tracks for Kids
By Gary Robson

Learning to identify an animal by their scat and tracks helps one connect with nature. Reading through Who Pooped in Central Park you realize that even in the busy city of New York  there's lots of wildlife to be found. In this adventure, Emma, Jackson, Lily, and Tony take a stroll through the park meeting different folks, each who passes a bit of  knowledge on to them. The first person they meet is Lawton. Lawton teaches the kids about rats. Off to the side, in The Straight Poop box (a box that shares random information pertaining to the story) Gary encourages the reader to clean up after themself by throwing trash away and reminds young readers to never approach a rat despite how friendly it may appear. Back to Lawton, so Lawton teaches the kids to identify rats and then a muskrat is spotted. Lawton enlightens us that a muskrat isn't a rat despite the word rat being used in it's name. The kiddos wander away from Lawton and head on their way. They discover many other interesting animals along the way, of course,  identifying them by their scat and tracks.

There's a lot to be learned in between the covers of this book. Did you know coyotes sometimes make their way to Central Park?! This piece of information was a real conversation starter in our house. A coyote in the suburbs! You'll also learn about Pale Male, a red tailed hawk that has lived on a building near Central Park since the 1990s. This sparked questions, "Mama if it's a mommy hawk  why is it called male?" "I don't know. Let's find out the origin of its name, shall we?"

Discover why some cops ride horses instead of having cars or motorcycles. Learn about the different ducks and fish in the park. Did you know that a lot of turtles and goldfish in Central Park are abandoned pets?! Me neither!!! At least, I didn't until Gary taught me. Learn how to safely poke at scat and to dissect it if you wish. It may sound gross but it really helps you identify an animal. For example, a woodpeckers poo will be full of bug parts! And come on, I'm sure you examined owl pellets in Jr High.  You'll read why artists photograph the bird they want to draw. End the day with some moth and bat watching. While the book emphasizes scat and tracks theres more to be learned. Quite a bit to be learned!  The book is a short read with bright colored pictures.

Finding nature in a big city like New York just taught me that  when you really stop to smell the roses you'll notice the small critters feasting on it. Nature is everywhere and thank God for that.

I recieved a complimentary copy in exchange for an honest review.

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